Gallery

Snippets of Central Texas’s Past and Present


Horse2118

Texas, “The Lone Star State”.

The state of Texas, has a diverse history through the ages. When one thinks of Texas, they often think of Vaqueros (cowboys). They may also think of the Indians, that roamed the plains and hill sides.

A brief explanation of Texas is hard to do within a few short words. Texas is the second-largest U.S. state by both area and population, and the largest state in the contiguous United States. The name, meaning “friends” or “allies” in Caddo, was applied by the Spanish to the Caddo themselves and to the region of their settlement in East Texas. Located in the South Central United States, Texas is bordered by Mexico to the south, New Mexico to the west, Oklahoma to the north, Arkansas to the northeast, and Louisiana to the east.

Texas contains diverse landscapes that resemble both the American South and Southwest. Although Texas is popularly associated with the Southwestern deserts, less than 10% of the land area is desert. Most of the population centers are located in areas of former prairies, grasslands, forests, and the coastline. Traveling from east to west, one can observe terrain that ranges from coastal swamps and piney woods, to rolling plains and rugged hills, and finally the desert and mountains of the Big Bend.

One Texas industry that thrived after the Civil War was cattle. Due to its long history as a center of the industry, Texas is associated with the image of the cowboy. The state’s economic fortunes changed in the early 20th century, when oildiscoveries initiated an economic boom in the state.

The name Texas derives from táyshaʔ, a word in the Caddoan language of the Hasinai, which means “friends” or “allies”.Whether a Native American tribe was friendly or warlike was critical to the fates of European explorers and settlers in this land.Friendly tribes taught newcomers how to grow indigenous crops, prepare foods, and hunt wild game. Warlike tribes made life difficult and dangerous for Europeans through their attacks and resistance to the newcomers.

We could go on with history but some times a few images speak louder to us than words. The images within of here are snippets of life back in time as well as the present of now. I find that many do not realize what lies beyond of the city depths that await for us to explore and to take notice of. These are just a few images, there is much more than these images to what “Texas”, is today.

The images here are of central Texas, of  the Dallas and Fort Worth  areas, as well as outside of the confines of the metroplex areas. A few of the pictures that are old  archive images are from the visitors information center at Eagle Mountain Lake Park, located outside of Fort Worth, Texas. All other images are those of mine, from where the path was journeyed during a recent week.

 

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DSC_0561_79   There were days of when the buffalo roamed the plains. ( Photo source of origin unknown)

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A “Native American Indian”, beats a drum. ( Photo source of origin unknown)

DSC_0565_83 Herding the cattle. ( Photo source of origin unknown)

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An old  archive image of , Eagle Mountain Lake. ( Photo source of origin unknown)

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Texas Long Horns today

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